1. IT World Canada Curated

    IT World Canada is the Canadian affiliate of International Data Group (IDG), the world’s largest IT information media provider. We’ve been creating conversations and building relationships with Canada’s technology professionals, business managers and executives for over twenty-five years by delivering timely, incisive information they can trust through a variety of digital publications, events and print brands.

    Reaching the distinct and influential decision maker in business and the business of Information Technology, (French and English) readership totals with reach of 2.5 pass along, 300,000, and 120,000 individual IT professionals and business executives…and still growing because we are Canada’s trusted IT Media Publishers. Our mission is to inform, to teach, to empower, to connect.

    • ENGAGED readers is our secret sauce.
    • EXPOSED messaging of our clients’ expertise and value to themost targeted IT audience in Canada.
    • LEVERAGED media, both traditional and emerging, creates innovative campaigns.
    • ALIGNED communication and interaction within contextually relevant editorial, conversations, videos, events and now mobile.
  2. Recent Comments

  1. Recent Articles

    1. Microsoft extends Windows 8.1 Update migration deadline for business

      Explore Computerworld (Apr 17 2014)

      Microsoft extends Windows 8.1 Update migration deadline for business

      Microsoft on Wednesday extended the Windows 8.1 Update migration deadline for businesses by three months, but again told consumers they had less than four weeks to make the move before the company shuts off their patch faucet.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   Microsoft

    2. Montreal subway currently testing underground wireless service, will go live ‘as soon as the tests are successful’

      Explore MobileSyrup.com (Apr 15 2014)

      Montreal subway currently testing underground wireless service, will go live ‘as soon as the tests are successful’

      Late last year the Société de transport de Montreal (STM), Bell, Rogers, TELUS and Videotron announced that they’d come together to bring cell service to the subway system (3G, 4G and LTE). The initiative would cost around $50 million and be “divided into five phases that should be completed within a period of five to seven years.”

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   Telus

    3. Ubuntu 14.04 Server Brings Virtualization, Automation, Storage Updates

      Explore VAR, MSP and solutions provider news (Apr 15 2014)

      Ubuntu 14.04, the newest edition of Canonical's open source Linux-based OS, will not make huge waves among PC and mobile users, for whom it brings only minor software updates. For server users, however, the latest and greatest Ubuntu release delivers more, particularly in the realms of automation, cloud-computing and virtualization.

      Content Classification:  Curated
      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   open source

    4. The CSO tango: Keeping in step with your security team

      Explore cio.com.au (Apr 13 2014)

      The CSO tango: Keeping in step with your security team

      While new attack techniques and complicated, insecure software provide enough strain on the CIO, seeing eye to eye with the CSO can be equally trying.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   Cisco

    5. Graham Cluley nominated for seven security blogging awards

      Explore Graham Cluley (Apr 13 2014)

      Graham Cluley nominated for seven security blogging awards

      Vote now for you-know-who in the EU Security Blogger awards!

      (Pretty please.. grovel.. grovel..)

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    6. Tests Confirm Heartbleed Bug Can Expose Server's Private Key

      Explore CIO.com (Apr 13 2014)

      Tests Confirm Heartbleed Bug Can Expose Server's Private Key

      CloudFlare said its challenge shows how dangerous is the OpenSSL bug

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    7. Obama lets NSA use zero-day flaws given “clear national security” need

      Explore Ars Technica (Apr 13 2014)

      Obama lets NSA use zero-day flaws given “clear national security” need
      The White House

      President Barack Obama has explicitly decided that when any federal agency discovers a vulnerability in online security, the agency should come forward, rather than exploit it for intelligence purposes, according to The New York Times, citing unnamed “senior administration officials.”

      However, while there is now a stated “bias” towards disclosure, Obama has also created a massive exception to this policy, if "there is a clear national security or law enforcement need."

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    8. Tests confirm Heartbleed bug can expose server's private key

      Explore pcworld.com (Apr 13 2014)

      Four researchers working separately have demonstrated a server’s private encryption key can be obtained using the Heartbleed bug, an attack thought possible but unconfirmed.

      The findings come shortly after a challenge created by CloudFlare, a San Francisco-based company that runs a security and redundancy service for website operators.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   operating systems   open source

    9. Obama Lets N.S.A. Exploit Some Internet Flaws, Officials Say (David E. Sanger/New York Times)

      Explore Techmeme (Apr 12 2014)

      Obama Lets N.S.A. Exploit Some Internet Flaws, Officials Say (David E. Sanger/New York Times)

      David E. Sanger / New York Times: Obama Lets N.S.A. Exploit Some Internet Flaws, Officials Say  —  WASHINGTON — Stepping into a heated debate within the nation's intelligence agencies, President Obama has decided that when the National Security Agency discovers major flaws in Internet security, it should — in most circumstances …

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    10. A+E Networks Shares Mobile Analytics Best Practices at Adobe Summit

      Explore Adobe Blogs (Apr 12 2014)

      A+E Networks Shares Mobile Analytics Best Practices at Adobe Summit

      “Downloads are the mobile equivalent of ‘Hits’ for a website,” quips Nick Earl, senior manager of digital media analytics at A+E Networks.  “It’s not 1995 anymore, we need to move on!”

      According to Earl, downloads are “a great metric for press releases, but that’s about it.” He pointedly asks, “Does it tell us anything about how many users we’re going to have next month? Does it tell us anything about engagement? Does it tell us anything that can help us improve our app?”

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment Mentions:   Adobe

    11. The NSA knew about Heartbleed bug for two years, claims report

      Explore hotforsecurity.com (Apr 12 2014)

      Has the United States’ National Security Agency (NSA) really known about the Heartbleed bug (and presumably exploiting it for surveillance purposes) for two years?

      And, if it's true, would you be surprised?

      Read my article on the Hot for Security blog to find out more.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    12. NSA denies it knew about Heartbleed flaw

      Explore Computerworld (Apr 11 2014)

      NSA denies it knew about Heartbleed flaw

      IDG News Service - The U.S. National Security Agency, which has a cybersecurity mission in addition to surveillance, has disputed a report that it knew about the Heartbleed security vulnerability for at least two years before other researchers disclosed the flaw this month.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    13. NSA denies knowing about Heartbleed flaw for years

      Explore networkworld.com (Apr 11 2014)

      NSA denies knowing about Heartbleed flaw for years

      The U.S. National Security Agency, which has a cybersecurity mission in addition to surveillance, has disputed a report that it knew about the Heartbleed security vulnerability for at least two years before other researchers disclosed the flaw this month.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    14. NSA denies knowing about Heartbleed flaw for years

      Explore IT news, technology analysis and how (Apr 11 2014)

      NSA denies knowing about Heartbleed flaw for years

      The U.S. National Security Agency, which has a cybersecurity mission in addition to surveillance, has disputed a report that it knew about the Heartbleed security vulnerability for at least two years before other researchers disclosed the flaw this month. read more

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment

    15. Even Before Heartbleed, Improper Use of SSL Put Users at Risk

      Explore channelinsider.com (Apr 11 2014)

      Even Before Heartbleed, Improper Use of SSL Put Users at Risk

      Heartbleed is serious, but the simple reality is that most Websites and many end users don't use SSL properly to begin with.

      (Read Full Article)

      Comment